New Release: “When Day Is Done” by Yvonne Engela, edited by Christina Engela


Now available – “When Day Is Done” by Yvonne Lorraine Engela (edited by Christina Engela), a volume containing 81 poems by a previously unknown South African poet.

Christina Engela is proud to present an unknown and talented new South African poet to the world – her mother – Yvonne Lorraine Engela.

I Am The Master Of My Soul

Nothing will ever hurt me
Or stop me to reach my goal
For life is just another challenge
And I’m the master of my soul.

Nobody can ever conquer me
My body yes, should it suit my role –
But I am free, as free as air
I am the master of my soul.

For men will come and go
Until the bells do toll
But I’ll go on forever
I am the master of my soul

A Rose

If on a rubbish heap can grow a rose
And manure be used to make soil fertile
So too can man remain untouched
By environments most vile.

And if in weeds a flower grows
It’s fragrance still is smelt
So too a soul can soar
Above the filth in which it dwelt.

Farewell

Shed no tears tonight
Though the future may seem dark
Let tonight be bright
With laughter and champagne.

Tonight must be happy and gay
What does it matter if we’re pretending?
Tomorrow is another day
And we don’t know what it may bring.

So lift your glass and drink
In memory of the past
And smile, and laugh, and wink
When tears are threatening to fall.

Shed no tears tonight
Cry tomorrow if you must
Even if there is no happiness in sight
Tonight your eyes must shine with love.

 

When Day Is Done

Many a dream has paid its toll
As can be seen
From the graveyard of my soul
And when day is done
The ghosts awake
To haunt the heart of this frail frame.

When day is done
And night draws near
Memories come
Like shades of death
Creeping, crawling closer
Till in loneliness I’m cloaked.

I hate the darkness
Fear the night
And the vastness
Of despair it brings
When the phantoms of my soul
Will rise, and walk, and talk.

Back Cover:

“Time marches on for all of us. Childhood. Growing up. Romance. Sorrow. Heartbreak. Melancholy. Marriage. Divorce. Death. Work – always work. Unlike most people, some write about it to analyze our feelings and thoughts, to expel them, or to share.

Yvonne Lorraine (van der Westhuizen) Engela was born in the Eastern Cape in South Africa in 1934. Between 1953 and 1972, she eagerly wrote poetry in both her home language Afrikaans, and in English. She never thought her poetry would ever be good enough to publish. Life was far too hectic. She had to work hard and continuously to support a husband, and later a child. being a single mother was never easy, and she was a humble person. Later on, she put it all away and didn’t talk about it anymore. Her child brought her the joy and happiness that nobody else could. Life went on…

Then one day, at 79 years of age, she died suddenly. Not long after her death, her daughter began to clean up and process her belongings – and found a stash of old notebooks full of poetry written in her youth. And she read them – and realized what a treasure trove her mother had left her. A look inside her mother’s soul, as a young woman, and as a talented writer and poet…

Yvonne had underestimated herself. How many writers or poets in the world had ever written equally as well in two languages? In English and Afrikaans? There can’t be many.

Christina Engela is proud to announce an unknown and talented new South African poet to the world – her mother – Yvonne Lorraine Engela.”

Order:Print / Ebook

Details:

Published: April 11, 2018
Pages: 106
Binding: Perfect-bound Paperback (6×9″)
Author: Yvonne Lorraine Engela (Edited by Christina Engela)

More about the author:

Yvonne Engela

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: