Children’s Stories


“Other Kids Are Kids Almost Just Like You”

Some of you might remember I once did a short story (with illustrations) for kids… or rather, a story for parents NOT to read to their kids… I called “Innocent Minds” my “one attempt to write a children’s story”… well, recently I was persuaded to attempt a REAL children’s story for ACTUAL kids. Wow. That was intimidating.

Those of you who know me well, know that while I like kids in general, I am quite uncomfortable around them. You see, I don’t really ‘get’ them very well. Last night, as I worked on the surprisingly complex, and misleadingly simple text for the book, it occurred to me why this was.

You see, children are honest. Absolutely, unequivocally honest. Whether they love you or hate peanut-butter or can’t stand a pair of shoes… they are 100% honest about it. They haven’t learned to lie yet, to hide their feelings, or to live complex lives where they have a hundred-million thoughts flashing through their heads at any one moment, about a thousand different things, distracted, diffused, and watered-down.Their feelings are pure – not in the sense of ‘good’, but in the sense that they are ALL about whatever their focus is at any particular time, and all their emotions are invested in every word, every motion, and in their eyes.

When you can feel people’s emotions, and when you can deal with adults on a daily basis, it can be a little intimidating when you are confronted with total honesty at full power. Resistance is futile.

And so, with this in mind, I wrote the text for my first REAL little story for children.

It’s called “Other Kids Are Kids Almost Just Like You”. An artist is already busy working on the illustrations – and I promise, this one has no guns, or violins in it – not even a tiny one.

Dagan illustration sample

Apparently it’s surprisingly good – and I say ‘surprisingly’ because well, frankly, when people ask me if I want kids, I usually tell them “No thanks, I still need to drive”.

Perhaps in future I might think a little harder first, and then say: “Perhaps a little is okay.”

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