Section 9: Political Parties To Support/Not Support In SA Elections?


This page will be updated progressively as time allows.

The ANC (African National Congress)

Once the purported champion of human rights concerns in South Africa, the ANC has descended into first neglect of human rights for various minorities, and then outright selective opposition and obstruction of equality and human rights for some minorities.

  • 20161109 – ANC Government votes against LGBTI people’s human rights in UN. In November 2016, the SA government representatives in the UN announce their intention to vote against the creation of a watch dog, set up to create awareness of and improve the rights of LGBTI people across the world. The ANC fails its Constitutional obligation to protect and promote the principles of equality and human rights in the Constitution. The intention to vote to remove this watch dog sends a clear signal that South Africa’s government (ANC) does not support the promotion of and protection of LGBTI rights.
  • 20140314 “Satanic panic: God votes ANC – the rest can go to hell” Since 2008 the ANC has worked to align the ANC with Christian extremists in this country, starting with the Rhema cult’s mega-church when President Zuma made a controversial speech in the church during the run-up to the 2009  elections. It seems that since then – and increasingly so in the run-up to the 2014 elections, the ANC and Zuma are working to enforce the reality that the ANC (and with it the SA government) no longer represent the principles of the SA Constitution. The ANC now represents a Christian extremist minority view, and not the culturally diverse nation that is South Africa. Using religious minorities as strawmen and constructed enemies to attack in order to make their points. If they can use a polemic of warning people that “racism is Satanism”, what is stopping them from saying “racism is the same as Witchcraft, racism is Paganism”. As it is the general public (even in the more educated statistic group) finds it hard if not impossible to see these as separate from Satanism – and is wholly ignorant of the existence and definition of Satanic Ritual Abuse Hysteria. Now the ANC makes inflammatory statements to the equivalent that “not voting for the ANC is Satanism”. They really shouldn’t use and abuse the names of minority beliefs in this manner. It incites intolerance and even violence that would result from witch hunts. This article explores this practice by the ANC, delivering sensible critique. “Satanic panic: God votes ANC – the rest can go to hell” – Mail & Guardian “President Jacob Zuma appealed to Christian fundamentalists in his forecasts of power for the ANC, in a semantic shift in the way the party speaks of itself and its opposition.

ANC Juma like Jesus

Empires throughout history have set impressive time periods for their planned longevity, and the ANC has gone biblical with its own forecast, saying that it will rule until Jesus comes back.

This is part of a semantic shift in the way the party talks about itself and those who oppose it. “Even God expects us to rule this country because we are the only organisation which was blessed by pastors when it was formed,” said President Jacob Zuma at a rally in January. “This is why we will rule until Jesus comes back.” Previously, he said that by voting for the party, people would secure their place in heaven. ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe has likened the tripartite alliance to the Holy Trinity. Last week Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula said those who oppose his party or its leader are forces for evil. In this case, it was football fans at the FNB Stadium who had booed Zuma following Bafana Bafana’s 5-0 drubbing by Brazil.

Evil plans: An agitated Mbalula, speaking the next day, said: “All of their plans, infused by Satanism at best, will never succeed in the future because their plans are nothing else but filled with evil.” This type of language has started appearing in communiqués from the ANC, a party that once prided itself on being secular. In a response to the alleged racism at the North-West University campus in Potchefstroom, the party this week sent out an email titled “Racism is Satanism”.

Last year, Nono Maloyi, the MEC for human settlements and public safety in North West, blamed the devil for violence in the province. “Satanism is the only wicked force that leads wives to kill their husbands and their children, and for men to rape their own children.” Angie Motshekga, minister of basic education, asked for prayers for matric students in Mpumalanga last year. “We believe nothing can defeat prayer,” she said. “We will make sure that the kids are delivered from evil spirits and believe we will get the best results this year.”

Thanks be to God: Mcebisi Skwatsha, a member of the ANC’s national executive committee, told delegates at a list conference in the Northern Cape last year that, thanks to God, the party would win the elections: “We will not fear any weapons formed against us ahead of the 2014 general elections because God is with us.” At the same conference, Sindiso Mfenya, a provincial ANC member, went further and said former leader OR Tambo had told him that “the ANC had its own God” – that was why those who attack the party would be destroyed. Piet Naudé, professor of ethics at the Nelson Mandela University, said politicians using God to gain political credibility was as old as humanity itself. “We should not be surprised or even shocked when ANC leaders resort to Christian imagery to promote their cause.” But people should be wary of this kind of association, he said. “As a rule of thumb, one should rarely trust a politicians using God for election purposes. It is a transgression of the second commandment.”

National Party flavour: The language and iconography used is not unlike that of the Nat­ional Party. Apartheid was the will of God – a narrative reinforced by the Dutch Reformed Church. Afrikaners were chosen by God to bring light to what was they saw as the “dark continent”. When the apartheid regime came under pressure, the association was cranked up. In its darkest hours of the 1980s, the apartheid government used its favourite bogeyman, the communist rooi gevaar (red danger), as the embodiment of the devil. The ultimate expression of evil became a pervasive image in white culture, said Nicky Falkof. A lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand, she has written extensively about South Africa’s “satanic panic” and the race element that underpins it. “The belief in satanic conspiracy maintained apartheid’s work of racial separation and kept black and white youth in their place,” she said. The devil was seen as a “legitimate and real threat to white South Africa”, she said.

The fearmongering also led to the foundation of the police’s occult crimes unit. Its founder, Kobus Jonker, gained a fearful reputation. Known as “Donker Jonker”, he is a hard man to track down these days but, in a 2010 interview with the American magazine Vice, he said the devil was often used as an easy excuse by people. ‘Devil behind every bush’ “People jump on bandwagons and see the devil behind every bush,” he said. “It can be very dangerous.” But, he said, he had encountered many cases of “people being possessed” by the devil. He gave an example of a “girl who had ants crawling out of her breasts”.

The police say there has been a steady increase in the number of crimes related to satanic rituals in recent times. But South African courts try people according to the crimes committed and do not accept evidence based on the supernatural: claiming that your opponents are possessed by a satanic force holds no sway, except in the court of public or political opinion.”

  • 20140226 “‘No special comment needed’ on Ugandan law criminalising homosexuality – Pandor” – (“South Africa’s position on gay and lesbian rights are unchanged, but government will not comment on Uganda’s new legislation criminalising homosexuality, Home Affairs Minister Naledi Pandor has said.Answering questions from reporters on government’s work in Parliament this morning, Pandor said: “Countries pass many bills and we don’t really comment on them, so I don’t know why you need a special comment by the government on this.”She said Uganda’s new laws won’t change anything to South Africa’s stance either. “The position of South Africa on sexual orientation and the rights to equality are very clear, both in the bill of rights and the legislation that has been passed in this country. Our position is very clear and it’s not changed by any policy adopted by any country.”She said South Africa allowed homosexual people to marry and promoted equality in employment and other areas. “I don’t think we have moved away as South Africa from these positions,” she said.Uganda President Yoweri Museveni this week signed into law a bill that made homosexual acts punishable by life in prison.”)
  • 20140225 “Zuma’s ANC rejects DA motion to condemn Uganda’s anti-gay bill” – Sandy Kalyan, DA Deputy Chief Whip – (“The DA is deeply concerned and unspeakably disappointed that the ANC today blocked a DA motion without notice condemning the Anti-Homosexuality Bill signed into law by Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni, yesterday. It is also highly revealing that ANC MPs heckled me today when I raised this issue in the House, illustrating their brazen insensitivity if not support for this shocking measure. Our motion would have ensured that South Africa continues with the human rights-based foreign policy established by President Nelson Mandela and that we re-gain our moral standing in the international arena. It would have also made it clear to the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, that her failure to act decisively on this issue – as made clear in her department’s press release today – must be brought to an end. The ANC in Parliament did not seek to propose any amendments to the motion. It was merely rejected “in its entirety”. This continues the shameful failure by President Zuma’s administration to act on this matter. We must indeed ask why it is that South Africa always resorts to silent diplomacy when it instead should be providing leadership on the continent. With our proud history of fighting injustice, and with one of the most progressive constitutions in the world, our government should have been first to publically object to the barbaric laws of a state right on our doorstep. As the DA, we strongly condemn the passing of this Bill and the criminalisation of homosexuality anywhere on the continent and the world. The South African government, and the African Union, which is being chaired by, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, must be urged to act to ensure that Uganda’s suppression of human rights does not go without censure. The DA will continue to push for this to happen without delay.”)
  • 20100404 – Gay-bashing Qwelane goes to Kampala (“South Africa’s controversial gay-bashing High Commissioner to Uganda, Jon Qwelane – who is supposed to be the face of South Africa – quietly sneaked into Kampala during President Jacob Zuma’s state visit amid protests by gay groups for his recall. Qwelane’s presence has angered Ugandan gay groups, who feel his presence would reverse their fight against homophobia – given the country’s own repressive anti-gay laws. It is understood that interest groups had previously written to International Relations and Co-operation Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, requesting that the South African government reconsider Qwelane’s posting. It appears Zuma’s decision to post Qwelane was not reversed even when it was clear that it would cause diplomatic embarrassment for Pretoria. Qwelane publicly supported Zuma during the ANC’s ugly succession battle, including during the rape trial. To the shock of Uganda gay groups, they found out during Zuma’s visit that Qwelane was already in the country. Independent Newspapers has learnt that the authorities kept Qwelane’s presence in Uganda a low-key event – fearing a media storm that would overshadow Zuma’s visit. The usually outspoken Qwelane also kept a low profile during the state visit. When Zuma was in London last month, South Africa’s high commissioner to the UK, Zola Skweyiya, was at the forefront, briefing the media and diplomats and introducing the president to the host government. It is understood that the Department of International Relations and Co-operation has gagged Qwelane from commenting about homosexuality. Under Uganda’s penal code, homosexuality is criminalised. Uganda’s programmes co-ordinator of sexual minorities, Julian Pepe Onziema, told Independent Newspapers that they were working on a strategy to challenge Qwelane’s posting. “We are definitely talking about that with our allies, but at this stage we can’t reveal anything. (We are being secretive) about our plans because they are also being secretive about (Qwelane’s) presence in this country,” Onziema said. “The campaign (against him) is going to go ahead. “Because we haven’t heard from him we haven’t heard from the government.” It is understood that the groups also wanted to protest outside the South African High Commission – but Onziema denied this. Onziema said it was hypocritical for South Africa – with its gay-friendly laws – to post someone like Qwelane to the central African country. “How do you bring a very homophobic person to lead a diplomatic institution in a place where there is a lot of violation and discrimination of (gay and lesbian) people?” she asked. Onziema confirmed that they had lobbied local, regional and international interest groups to oppose Qwelane’s posting. But Qwelane said it was “news to me” that gay and lesbian groups in Uganda were against his posting. He denied that his arrival had been kept secret. “I don’t know what they are talking about. I was with (government) ministers the whole of last week,” he said, adding that he had arrived in the country on March 23. Zuma landed a day later. Qwelane refused to comment further. Meanwhile, the Ugandan parliament is sitting with the controversial Anti-Homosexuality Bill – which sent out shockwaves across the world with a clause which proposed that homosexuality should be punishable by death. Following international uproar, including a diplomatic protest from the US and UK governments, the offensive clause was removed. However, the bill is still considered to be harsh as it seeks to compel citizens to report anyone involved in homosexual activities. Qwelane has been quite open about his anti-gay views, and once wrote a homophobic column titled “Call me names, but Gay is not ok” in the Sunday Sun in 2008.The article compared homosexuality to bestiality. Qwelane even commended Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe for his “unflinching and unapologetic stance over homosexuals”. The column also prayed for politicians to have “the balls” to rewrite the South African constitution to outlaw homosexuality. South African interest groups complained to the Equality Court about Qwelane’s column, arguing that it promoted hate speech. The outcome is still pending. South Africa is the only country on the African continent that recognises the rights of homosexuals, which legally acknowledges their matrimonial contract through the civil union bill. Department of International Relations spokesman Saul Molobi could not confirm Qwelane’s diplomatic posting. “The reason I can neither confirm nor deny Mr Jon Qwelane’s alleged appointment is that according to diplomatic protocol you can’t confirm an appointment until the head of state of the receiving country has accepted the credentials of such a high commissioner/ambassador designate,” said Molobi. “Any deviation from this norm is interpreted as disrespect to the head of the receiving country, as he or she reserves the right to accept or decline the approval of the appointment of the nominated candidate. “This means I can’t comment beyond this on the matter at this stage”.”)
  • 20100120 – Qwelane ‘the wrong man’ (“President Jacob Zuma’s appointment of veteran journalist Jon Qwelane as South Africa’s ambassador to Uganda, with the Democratic Alliance saying Qwelane is a self-confessed homophobe. Qwelane, who spoke out against the persecution of Zuma by the media and National Prosecuting Authority when Zuma was being investigated for fraud and corruption, is also seen as a Zuma loyalist. DA spokesperson Lindiwe Mazibuko said the appointment would “damage South Africa’s credibility internationally as a… READ FULL NEWS AT SOWETAN”)
  • 20100119 – Qwelane considered as SA’s Uganda envoy – (“The Democratic Alliance on Tuesday urged President Jacob Zuma not to appoint outspoken columnist Jon Qwelane as South Africa’s ambassador to Uganda because it would seem to endorse that country’s persecution of gays. ”Jon Qwelane is a committed homophobe and his appointment could be seen as a tacit endorsement of the repressive stance Uganda is taking on homosexuality,” DA spokeswoman Lindiwe Mazibuko said. Uganda is under international pressure to withdraw a bill that would impose the death penalty for homosexual acts. ”The DA is of the opinion that the appointment of Mr Qwelane would not take into account the serious nature of this,” said Mazibuko. In his column in the Sunday Sun, Qwelane has stated that same sex marriage is “illogical” and that if any of his children had been gay, he would have disowned them. The veteran journalist was a vocal supporter of Zuma when the ANC leader battled fraud and corruption charges and it has been widely reported that he would soon be named ambassador to Kampala. The Sunday Times reported that the government was waiting for Uganda to approve the appointment. Mazibuko said Pretoria ought to be lobbying Uganda to drop plans to execute gays but instead “the president appears to be moving to appoint a man whose record for promoting intolerance, homophobia and prejudice in South Africa is well established and largely unparalleled”. Several rights groups have also signalled their opposition to Qwelane’s mooted appointment. – Sapa”)
  • 20091004 – “Gay Marriage Abortion Rights Not Under Threat” Mail & Guardian – (“he presidency has dismissed suggestions by conservative groups that President Jacob Zuma will change legislation on abortion and same-sex marriages. The presidency has poured cold water over suggestions by conservative Christian lobby groups that President Jacob Zuma will change legislation on abortion and same-sex marriages. Zuma’s spokesperson, Vusi Mona, told the Mail & Guardian this week that while the president has invited Christian groups to “come and debate” these issues, Zuma would nevertheless “uphold the Constitution”. But Zuma had promised worshippers at Rhema Church during his election campaign that he would consider requests to change legislation permitting abortion and same-sex marriages, Family Policy Institute (FPI) director Errol Naidoo has told the M&G. A Rhema statement issued after Zuma’s visit to the church in March confirms that Zuma “encouraged faith-based bodies to engage the government on such legislation as termination of pregnancy and same-sex marriage”.Naidoo recently posted a message on the FPI’s Facebook page, stating: “This is a crucial time to speak up for the right to life of pre-born babies. President Zuma has indicated that he is open to scrapping the abortion legislation.” The FPI is a Christian lobby group based in Cape Town that campaigns for Parliament to change laws that it says are inconsistent with Christian dogma. The organisation believes a minority grouping in the ANC and the government is responsible for pushing through laws that do not have the support of the majority of the country’s citizens. “We are actively engaging people on these issues; we are speaking to government and building consensus. We see that Jacob Zuma is more open to the church and we’re stepping up our efforts,” Naidoo said.The FPI has scheduled a meeting with Deputy Minister of Home Affairs Malusi Gigaba about pornography, and wants to meet National Police Commissioner Bheki Cele to discuss the Sexual Offences Act, which the FPI argues needs to be more rigorously implemented and enforced. “Our strategy is fourfold,” the FPI’s website states. “First, we begin with policy research, using the most up-to-date social science data available to demonstrate the vital link between the family and a healthy society. Second, we promote family-friendly policies and ideas in the public [sphere], framing arguments in a variety of publications. “Third, we advance these ideas within our national Parliament, provincial legislatures, city councils and the general public.” The FPI’s fourth strategy is to “nurture” in young people “a calling to public service”. Mona said Zuma’s comments at Rhema should not be seen as indicating his support for changes in legislation. “The president was saying: Let’s discuss and see who wins the day. The liberal interpretation of the Constitution may win the day, or the conservative interpretation may win the day. This is an opportunity to educate the conservatives and say that this is not a Christian state.”As a member of the ruling party Zuma cannot deviate from ANC policy, so assumptions that these laws can be changed “may be a bit misplaced”, said Mona. Zuma accepts that some feel the laws are incorrect and is of the view that South Africa cannot be an absolute state because that would be “fundamentalist”, he said, adding: “Everything is up for debate.””)
  • 20090914 – Concern Over Zuma’s God Squad – (“A report that a President Zuma sanctioned religious body will work to reverse gay marriage rights in South Africa has been slammed by activists. An article in last Friday’s issue of the Mail & Guardian, headlined “Zuma’s New God Squad Wants Liberal Laws To Go”, claimed that: “The National Interfaith Leadership Council (NILC), formed by Rhema church leader Ray McCauley and closely associated with President Jacob Zuma, flew its conservative colours this week, saying that it wants to revisit laws legalising abortion and same-sex marriages.” According to the newspaper, Nthabiseng Khunou, an ANC MP and member of the NILC, confirmed that the organisation would “play a role” in reviewing legislation legalising abortion and gay marriage. “I know most churches want them abolished, so the reason for NILC is to give a voice to people who don’t have it,” he was quoted as saying. The article raised concerns that the NILC was closely connected to the ANC, including using the ruling party’s offices and facilities in Parliament to disseminate its communications. The newspaper further said that at least four of the Council’s 20-member secretariat are ANC MPs. McCauley, however, told the newspaper that there were no formal links between the organisation and the ANC.In March, ahead of the April 22 elections, Zuma, in a controversial visit to Rhema’s headquarters, urged religious bodies to engage the government on the issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage. SA GLAAD, which described the NILC as “not only hostile to gay rights and women’s rights – but at its core – human rights as well,” was the first activist organisation to express its dismay at the report: “…Mr Zuma put the hard-won rights of the gay community to marry their partners on the bargaining table to secure more votes from the discerning Christian right”, said SA GLAAD in a statement. The organisation went on to add: “If Mr Zuma was bluffing when he made his offer to win their votes, then this promise has come back to haunt him. One has to question Mr Zuma’s intentions towards the pink community when he himself has made homophobic remarks which made headlines a few years ago. If his offer was a bluff at all, then Rhema and Ray Mccauley and fundamentalists in SA have just called it.” SA GLAAD noted that South Africa was a secular democracy and that religion had no place in governing the country.”)
  • 20090911 – “Zuma’s new God squad wants liberal laws to go – Mail & Guardian” – (“The National Interfaith Leadership Council flew its conservative colours this week, saying that it wants revisit laws legalising abortion. The National Interfaith Leadership Council, formed by Rhema church leader Ray McCauley and closely associated with President Jacob Zuma, flew its conservative colours this week, saying that it wants to revisit laws legalising abortion and same-sex marriages. Last week the council (NILC) entered the debate about the ­Judicial Service Commission’s decision to drop its investigation into Western Cape Judge President John ­Hlophe. It attacked the challenge to the JSC by Freedom Under Law, chaired by former Constitutional Court judge Johann Kriegler, and Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s support for it, saying it could ‘only serve to further erode the integrity of the judiciary and undermine the confidence of the people in it”. ‘For us, the ruling signified closure on this sad chapter and paved the way for the judiciary to heal and move forward,” the NILC said. Nthabiseng Khunou, an ANC MP and member of the NILC secretariat, told the Mail & Guardian that the council would ‘play a role” in revisiting legislation legalising abortion and gay marriage. Khunou, a pastor, said the laws were very unpopular in South Africa’s churches: ‘I know most churches want them abolished, so the reason for NILC is to give a voice to people who don’t have it.” Khunou revealed that the NILC had recently discussed the possibility that South Africa might legalise prostitution, ‘saying: why has the church been so quiet about it? We must play our role here.” Interviewed this week McCauley, the council’s national convener, denied any formal links between the organisation and the ANC. But at least four members of the 20-odd group of religious leaders are ANC MPs, including heavyweights such as ANC chief whip Mathole Motshekga and former Western Cape premier Ebrahim Rasool. McCauley insisted the group was open to other political parties. But no religious leaders who support opposition parties have joined. ‘The NILC does not consult with the ANC, although there are people there who are part of the ANC,” he said. Motshekga said the ANC insisted that the party accorded the NILC no special treatment. ‘We’re on record as supporting [the] council and noted what it said about Judge Hlophe, but it is not for us to approve or disapprove.” McCauley was not speaking for the ANC, but for his own constituency. The M&G can also reveal that the NILC uses the ANC parliamentary caucus’s communication facilities to communicate with the media. The two NILC press statements were sent from the ANC’s offices in Parliament. Motshekga claimed to be unaware of this, while McCauley said the statements ‘should not have been sent from the ANC”. Khunou said ANC MPs are free to use party email facilities for any purpose they saw fit. Other ANC sources point to the close relationship between Motshekga and McCauley through which the idea for a new religious formation was hatched. McCauley controversially gave Zuma an exclusive platform to speak in his Johannesburg church during the ANC’s election campaign this year. Vusi Mona, at that time the Rhema spokesperson, defended the church’s decision to invite Zuma to address the congregation, and not leaders from other parties. Mona quit Rhema shortly after the elections to join Zuma’s presidential communications team. Self-confessed frand convict Carl ­Niehaus was also a Rhema spokesperson before his stint as ANC spindoctor during the election campaign. In August the NILC met Zuma and pledged its support in helping the government deal with service ­delivery protests. Other religious leaders have been caught off guard by the decision to launch the NILC. McCauley is a leader of the National Religious Leaders’ Forum (NRLF), which includes representatives of all the major faiths practised in South Africa. He did not attend an NRLF meeting on Wednesday. The general secretary of the South African Council of Churches, Eddie Makue, said the purpose of the NILC was unclear to the religious fraternity. The SACC is set to meet NILC leaders before the end of September to clarify matters, he said. He added that the Dutch Reformed Church, formerly linked to the apartheid government, was also considering joining the NILC. Makue said the SACC decided in 1995 to embark on ‘critical engagement” with the government: ‘We took the view that governments come and go, but the church will always remain.””)

The Democratic Alliance (DA)

The largest Opposition party since it weathered the first national elections, the DA has a consistent record of championing human rights issues, including freedom of religion (although vocal condemnation of religious persecution of religious minorities has mostly been absent) LGBT equality and so forth.

The DA has remained silent on issues such as Christianity being forced into public (state-run) schools which should according to the Constitution, remain secular and has repeatedly failed to speak out against media hysteria painting Pagans and occultists as ‘Satanists’, and further, has remained aloof on matters such as the Occult Crimes Unit (SA Police) which conflates all occult religions with its own fantasy version of legend tripping ‘satanism’ and operates with the blessing of the government.

Regardless of their shortcomings, the DA is still the only large opposition party standing a chance of forcing a coalition government, and even winning an election, which demonstrates open support for LGBT equality and human rights in general. It has consistently demonstrated open membership policies, with many members and public reps of this party being from backgrounds generally shunned or condemned by other parties (especially the right-wing religious fundamentalist parties) for example LGBT and non-Christians and even Pagans.

  • 20140225 “Press release: Zuma’s ANC rejects DA motion to condemn Uganda’s anti-gay bill” – (“The DA is deeply concerned and unspeakably disappointed that the ANC today blocked a DA motion without notice condemning the Anti-Homosexuality Bill signed into law by Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni, yesterday. It is also highly revealing that ANC MPs heckled me today when I raised this issue in the House, illustrating their brazen insensitivity if not support for this shocking measure. Our motion would have ensured that South Africa continues with the human rights-based foreign policy established by President Nelson Mandela and that we re-gain our moral standing in the international arena. It would have also made it clear to the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, that her failure to act decisively on this issue – as made clear in her department’s press release today – must be brought to an end. The ANC in Parliament did not seek to propose any amendments to the motion. It was merely rejected “in its entirety”. This continues the shameful failure by President Zuma’s administration to act on this matter. We must indeed ask why it is that South Africa always resorts to silent diplomacy when it instead should be providing leadership on the continent. With our proud history of fighting injustice, and with one of the most progressive constitutions in the world, our government should have been first to publically object to the barbaric laws of a state right on our doorstep. As the DA, we strongly condemn the passing of this Bill and the criminalisation of homosexuality anywhere on the continent and the world. The South African government, and the African Union, which is being chaired by, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, must be urged to act to ensure that Uganda’s suppression of human rights does not go without censure. The DA will continue to push for this to happen without delay.”)
  • 20140225 “Zuma’s ANC rejects DA motion to condemn Uganda’s anti-gay bill” – Sandy Kalyan, DA Deputy Chief Whip – (“The DA is deeply concerned and unspeakably disappointed that the ANC today blocked a DA motion without notice condemning the Anti-Homosexuality Bill signed into law by Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni, yesterday. It is also highly revealing that ANC MPs heckled me today when I raised this issue in the House, illustrating their brazen insensitivity if not support for this shocking measure. Our motion would have ensured that South Africa continues with the human rights-based foreign policy established by President Nelson Mandela and that we re-gain our moral standing in the international arena. It would have also made it clear to the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, that her failure to act decisively on this issue – as made clear in her department’s press release today – must be brought to an end. The ANC in Parliament did not seek to propose any amendments to the motion. It was merely rejected “in its entirety”. This continues the shameful failure by President Zuma’s administration to act on this matter. We must indeed ask why it is that South Africa always resorts to silent diplomacy when it instead should be providing leadership on the continent. With our proud history of fighting injustice, and with one of the most progressive constitutions in the world, our government should have been first to publically object to the barbaric laws of a state right on our doorstep. As the DA, we strongly condemn the passing of this Bill and the criminalisation of homosexuality anywhere on the continent and the world. The South African government, and the African Union, which is being chaired by, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, must be urged to act to ensure that Uganda’s suppression of human rights does not go without censure. The DA will continue to push for this to happen without delay.”)

Congress of the People (COPE)

The COPE party, while being very supportive of gay and lesbian rights, does not specifically address transgender interests, most likely because it does not understand that ‘gay’ does not cover the whole LGBTI spectrum. Regardless, the COPE party, founded in 2008 when the ANC split, once stood a chance of sinking the ANC in the 2009 elections, but has since grown smaller and smaller to be virtually insignificant on the South African political scene, to the extent where given the option of voting DA, a vote for the COPE party would be a wasted vote in favor of the ANC.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF)

An overtly racist anti-white political party built on an ‘African revolutionary’ theme. Their repertoire includes rioting in Parliament, inciting racial hatred and violence in speeches and statements, up to and including threatening the white minority with violent extermination. Their leader Julius Malema, a long-time fan of Robert Mugabe’s land-grabs and autocratic leadership style, has little to no knowledge about LGBT people or their issues, and has at times demonstrated this lack of understanding in his statements.

Right Wing Religious “Political Parties”:

The African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP)

The largest right wing Christianist “political party” in South Africa, which isn’t saying much. Their rhetoric and policy is pure dominionism (Kingdom Now Theology) which literally means they set out to turn South Africa into a Christian extremist theocracy. They oppose human rights, viewing the concept as an ‘opposing religion’ which they refer to as ‘secular humanism’. The marking characteristic of this group is the tangible hatred they hold for LGBT people, and you will find that the removal of LGBTI human rights protections, hate crimes laws or anti-discrimination laws will always come under fire from them. The ACDP also draws on distorted Christian bible tracts – and the fake “science” of discredited American former psychologist Paul Cameron to try to justify their hatred. This party is little more than a homophobic Christian terrorist hate group masquerading as a respectable, serious political party. Although its support grew among fanatical Christianists between its founding in 1991 and the 2009 elections, its support has waned since, with the ACDP all but disappearing from Parliament by 2016. Hopefully by the next election, they will vanish altogether.

The Christian Democratic Alliance (CDA)

Another dominionist “Christian” “political party” smaller than the ACDP, having broke away from that party, the once arrogant cluster of minute smaller “Christian nationalist” party is no more.

First coming onto the scene in time for the 2009 Presidential election, the CDA bellowed intolerance and conquest of the country using terms like “the Great Commission” to justify its attack on human rights – specifically on the grounds of religious fundamentalist values and the destruction of LGBT rights and LGBT people. This small alliance of even smaller religious political parties (whose supporters vocally expressed wishes to have LGBT people executed back in 2009) no longer appears on the list of registered political parties in South Africa. It seems that by 2014 the core of the CDA, that is, the Christian Democratic Party (CDP) has all but imploded. Nothing has been heard of the other alliance member groups or leaders since the 2009 elections.

  • 20140312 – Christian Democratic Party pulls out of elections – (“The Christian Democratic Party will not take part in the upcoming general elections.“[We] decided not to take part in the 2014 May election,” party leader Theunis Botha said in a statement.“In 2012, the CDP began to question the IEC on the punitive manner in which it confiscates deposit funds from parties that do not gain a seat in elections.”Botha said the Independnet Electoral Commission (IEC) had failed to address the issue of confiscating deposits.“The CDP will not continue to waste its members’ hard-earned money on the gamble of trying to gain a seat, without the resources, to market its unique policies.”The IEC’s commitment to a free and fair election was not being met “as it cannot be considered free” if a deposit has to be paid and can be confiscated from a party.This made it hard for the party to continue promoting its policies, he said.“It is not fair when parties like the ANC and the Democratic Alliance between them receive close to R1 hundred million of taxpayers’ money a year to promote their policies,” he said. Botha said since its inception in 1999, his party had taken part in every election at national and local level and had lost hundreds of thousands of rands in confiscated deposits that could have been used to market and grow the party. A comment from IEC spokesperson Kate Bapela could not be obtained.”) Secondary source.

 People’s Revolutionary Movement (PRM)

New kid on the block, announced in November 2016, this party – also based on distorted Christianity, has made destroying LGBT human rights protections and equality laws its first order of business.  Basically, they espouse the same deplorable fascist and racist values as Donald Trump and his neo-Nazi followers, vowing to overturn LGBTI human rights, to deport all foreigners, and to continue the efforts of the terrorist ‘Fees Must Fall’ student movement that burns universities, stones cars and has injured or killed innocent people in the name of ‘decolonization’ – which essentially means the targeting and removal of white people and traces of European culture in South Africa.

  • NEWLY launched political party People’s Revolutionary Movement (PRM) is calling on the Minister of Home Affairs Malusi Gigaba to provide a platform for discussion of same sex marriages.PRM national spokesman Nhlanhla Mhlongo told Daily Sun that the issue of same-sex relationships was a serious one that needed careful consideration. “As a movement we are 100 percent against same-sex marriages. The movement stands for a normal society that consists of men and women.”He said they saluted all the church leaders who observed God’s commandments. “We denounce those leaders who promote Sodom and Gomorrah in the land of our kings and queens.” Speaking to party members at the official launch in Durban on Sunday, PRM president Nhlanhla Buthelezi said they valued the historic role played by the African kings, queens and all the traditional leaders. “We will campaign for aggressive, vigorous and visible results of Operation Pakisa, so all illegal foreign nationals are repatriated to their countries.” He called for free, quality education and a decolonised education system at all levels. He added that they also supported the move for South Africa to resign from the International Criminal Court. Sbongiseni Khumalo, programmes manager at the Durban Gay and Lesbian Community Health Centre said: “We are all guided by the Constitution. We understand that everyone has their own opinions. But people should be careful in what they say because things like this can lead to hate crimes. It is only our sexual orientation that makes us different.” Javu Baloyi, Commission for Gender Equality spokesman said that everyone had a right to their sexual preferences. Mayihlome Tshwete, spokesman for Home Affairs, said it was not the mandate of the department to create a platform for discussions. “If they want to discuss the issue they can do it on their own.”

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  1. Trackback: Section 9: Political Parties To Support/Not Support In SA Elections? | Darklady Likes

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