Other Kids Are Kids Almost Just Like You


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Details:

Published: August 18, 2016
Pages: 36
Binding: Perfect-bound Paperback
Dimensions (inches): 8.5″ x 8.5″ (Square)

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Back Cover:

“Join a lovable group of children in a delightful romp through an explanation of diversity, understanding it better, encouraging them to be compassionate towards others, regardless of who they are.

Many kids today face bullying from their peers based on differences in race, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity.

In a world where bullying and intolerance of diversity is becoming increasingly a problem, it’s important to teach children – and adults – compassion for others.

This book was written to inspire kids (and the adults who read it with kids) who are bullied for being different without focusing too strongly on the bullying angle.

Christina Engela is an author and long-time human rights activist with experience in dealing with various types of bullying.”

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Synopsis:

Many kids today face bullying from their peers. Day after day we see tragic news of children who face bullying, where children die, commit suicide, or are seriously injured, either physically or psychologically. Sadly, the biggest lie schools can tell is ‘bullying is not tolerated here’, because as long as the underlying causes of bullying are not addressed, bullying will occur to some degree.

Bullying takes place based on perceived differences. Typically this is due to perceived differences in race, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity, or even due to these differences being perceived in people the victims are associated with, such as their parents.

The very worst thing a parent or teacher or other care-giver can do, is to ignore bullying, to ignore the plight of a child being bullied, or trivialize or even blame a child for the bullying actions of others.

In a world where bullying and intolerance of diversity is becoming increasingly a problem, it’s important to teach children – and adults – compassion for others. Often, children who bully, can grow up to be bullies in adult life as well.

Isn’t it true that people – even adults – attack that which they fear – and fear that which they do not understand?

This book was written to inspire kids (and the adults who read it with kids) who are bullied for being different without focusing too strongly on the bullying angle. Rather, the story works to explain differences and diversity with child-like simplicity.

Christina Engela is an author and long-time human rights activist with experience in dealing with various types of bullying.

Reviews:

A Small Gem

Author and activist Christina Engela’s ‘Other Kids are Kids Almost Just Like You’ is a small gem, a humorous, non-didactic children’s book that sings the joys of difference, whether it be race, sexual orientation or just the pride of individuality. ‘Other Kids’ teaches a gentle lesson about the serious issue of bullying. Nobody works harder to combat transphobia, homophobia and the douchebaggery of the radical ‘Christian’ right than Christina Engela. I thought I had trolls – imagine being sandbagged by an entire gang of hatemongers for Jesus. Yet in true karmic fashion, the locusts swarmed only to reinforce the point Christina makes in her excellent new children’s book, over which they had descended. With beautiful illustrations by Amanda M. Lyons and a powerful, humor-infused message to kids: it’s not only ok to be different, it’s brilliant.” – Alex S. Johnson, Author of ‘The Doom Hippes’.

Reader Comments:

I Would Recommend It

“Excellent tool to teach children to accept people who are different. I would recommend it to anyone who has children and is against bullying.” – Customer, Barnes & Nobel.

Background:

other-kids

Let me start off by saying that I do not write stories for children. This was a fluke, a karmic train-smash, a collision of circumstances and contrasting feelings both fortuitous and cataclysmic… etcetera, and so forth.

That said, this story is special to me – mostly because of the message it presents to not only young minds, but also to the parents, teachers, adults and young adults (hopefully) who will read this story to the children in their lives – and the children themselves. It’s also because of the topics it addresses – bullying, intolerance, diversity and acceptance of each other as people.

This is what my editor said to me: “I’d put it in the 5 to 6 yr old range but that’s the age we need to teach kids to be kind so perfect!”

When I approached the (first) illustrator, I told him that I’d like lots of color. I imagine little kids in regular kids clothes, in the company of puppies and kittens etc. The overall idea is a positive ‘up’ theme.

This was written to inspire kids who are bullied for being different without focusing too strongly on the bullying concept or on harping on the transgender bullying angle – even though the concept for this story was suggested based on someone I know having a young pre-teen child experiencing a lot of the harassment and emotional trauma of growing up transgender.

Dagan illustration sample

I asked the (first) illustrator to draw kids of different races, a girl dressed like a boy, a feminine boy, a butch boy and a feminine girl, one of them black, another Asian or brown etc – I think you get the idea. Diversity – and diversity with a happy ending.

The above illustration is a sample sent to me by the (first) illustrator and I think he was on the right track. At any rate, by May 2015 I had to find a new illustrator, and this children’s story seemed to be well on its way to being published by J. Ellington Ashton Press. This title was to be released in 2015, and it seemed that this was going to happen. The second illustrator (Amanda M. Lyons) delivered a set of beautiful images, and I waited for the publisher to get back to me with a date to send them the manuscript.

group photo at end Some boys feel like they are girlsSome kids think its cool to bully

By May 2016 however, I was met with the disappointing news that the publisher was cutting down on their author listing and limiting themselves to the ‘pure horror’ genre. After having re-released all other titles already with them, as well as those which had been waiting, I decided to release this story myself as well.

The book was released on August 7, 2016. The illustrator (Amanda M. Lyons) delivered a set of 20 beautiful images!

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